Painting Clear Color Gundam kits with acrylic

After googling a lot, I have some questions on painting clear color Gunpla kits: Can I go for normal Tamiya Acrylic paints instead of the clear acrylic paints?? Of course, thin the normal paints with isopropyl alcohol and preserve the concoction in a empty jar. And by painting said concoction on the plastic, will it produce an opaque coat or the intended clear coloring coat??

I do not have an airbrush though, just the aforementioned iso-alcohol and some handbrushes.

Please answer, no flames!

If you use the traditional paints on a clear molded plastic, it will not longer be transparent. The paint will cover it up and it’ll just appear like a normal model. If you’re wanting to maintain the translucent appearance you’ll need to use the clear paints.

First off, welcome to the boards! Like Thwalker said: if you use normal paints, it will just look like a regular model. I wouldn’t hand-brush Tamiya Acrylics, though. People say it leaves nasty brush marks. You don’t need to worry about flames here, nobody is going to do that to you. :slight_smile:

One other thing, it’s very difficult to change the color of colored clear plastic to something else, even with an AB. However, if you just want to enhance those colors (brighter clear red, darker clear blue, etc) or hide nub marks on those clear parts, that can be done with clear paints.

If you’re using Tamiya clear acrylics and applying by hand, it’s advised to use either their brand of acrylic thinner or put in some retarder to slow the drying process so the paint has time to even out. Combine that with painting each layer in as few strokes as possible (as well as alternating strokes) and using a larger brush for big areas, you should be able to avoid those brush marks that Bossguy mentioned (which tends to happen easily with Tamiya acrylics).

Yes, I am going to enhance the colors!

If you’re using Tamiya clear acrylics and applying by hand, it’s advised to use either their brand of acrylic thinner or put in some retarder to slow the drying process so the paint has time to even out. Combine that with painting each layer in as few strokes as possible (as well as alternating strokes) and using a larger brush for big areas, you should be able to avoid those brush marks that Bossguy mentioned (which tends to happen easily with Tamiya acrylics).
Retarder is considered though I haven’t used one. For the drying process, why actual thinner instead of Iso-alcohol??

And the college I go to luckily has large paintbrushes. I’ll be able to get one!!

Iso-alcohol makes the drying time INCREDIBLY fast. It will dry within seconds if you thin it too much with the alcohol.

The truth has been spoken. 100% correct, ISO alcohol (the 90% kind) makes Tamiya acrylics dry very quickly. Not ideal for handpainting anything than small details, especially with how Tamiya can lift easily when handpainting (hence why few strokes is best). Their brand of thinner has a bit of retarder in it already so it’s simpler to use overall.

Since you’re trying to enhance the colors, start with thinning the clears at 1:2 (paint:thinner) and see how it works for you.

Noted.

Since you’re trying to enhance the colors, start with thinning the clears at 1:2 (paint:thinner) and see how it works for you.
Noted as well though to do this, I should have a measuring cup, fill the paint at the 5ml line then combine the thinner and have that fill the 10-15ml line??

Another thing: there’s no white clear acrylic in the Tamiya line??

There is no such thing as “white clear” Unfortunately. It’s virtually impossible to make a paint with that color. You don’t have to take a measuring cup to mix it. Just estimate the amount you should mix.

There isn’t a white clear, but you can try a white tint. Mix maybe a drop of Tamiya White to about five drops of Tamiya Clear and you’ll get a foggy white color. That’s about as close as you can get.

For the ratio, you can go by eye if your mixing container is clear, or just go by drops. 1 drop of paint to 2 drops of thinner. Make sure your dropping tool is consistent, though. If you used toothpicks to put down one drop of paint, but then use an eye dropper for the thinner, the ratio won’t be accurate, for example.