Getting rid of nubs

I am sure there’s been a post on this, but I seem to run into an issue - if I am using sandpaper it tends to “scratch” the surface more than smooth it out. So I kind of end up with a nub removed with a scratched spot. Any suggestions on how to smooth the nubs out without damaging the plastic?

Hmmm, I think the only way you can avoid obvious damage after sanding is to progressively sand to a higher grit (1500-grit and above). I always wet-sand a num area with 600-grit (this is automotive grade), then 1000-grit and finished off with either 1500-grit or 2000-grit. When I prime that area, there usually aren’t any more scratch marks left behind.

Polishing compounds may work too, but that may just be with restoring the shine.

Once free from the tree, try to remove most of the nub with the Exacto hobby knife first. If done right, sandpaper use should be minimal.

Also, don’t worry too much with the scratches. If it looks really bad, blot it out lightly with a Gundam paint pen that is in the color of the plastic. Once the clear flat coat is on, it’ll disappear.

I skip the sandpaper altogether and just use the exacto knife when I remove nubs.

I had this problem before. You’re using too low a grit. I use 400-600 then move up to 1000 and then so on, all the way up to a 3000 wet sanding grit pad. Just keep polishing it, and you’ll get it. If there are still scratches after the highest grit, go back to the last sandpaper you used and keep polishing.

Can vouch for this, since I use the same technique. I remove the nub with knife, left some of it but not to much, so the whitening of the plastic (i dunno what ita called) not appear in colored part , the sand it with at least 1500 grit sandpaper. Apply flatcoat and it’s dissappear.

  1. Free the part from the tree. Favorly far from the part.
  2. Trim the excess with art knife, and leave small amount of the nub.
  3. Sand it.

My system:

Cut away from part with Xuron cutters > cut close to part with Tamiya Sharp Pointed cutters > trim with Xacto blade > sand with increasing grits until nub is gone and surface is smooth.

I came on this thread expecting elitist rage at noobs at Gunpla LOL :stuck_out_tongue:

Wrong forum. :slight_smile:

^ What he said. Ain’t no elitists in this forum, at least when it comes to gunpla, haha. We’re too busy being chill.

That’s Reddit Gunpla not this place.

And as far as Nub Removal for me (I think I do a damn good job removing them, meh.)

Is literally what I do except I use Tamiya 74035 to cut it out of the Gate and God Hand Nippers cut close (Barely even needing to shave to be honest) and do exactly as Plamobot does, I shave it a total of 5 times, each angle slowly cutting it to the middle. I then either said it with 1500 slowly elevating to 3200 but to be honest I don’t even feel the need to do this.

That’s Reddit Gunpla not this place.

And as far as Nub Removal for me (I think I do a damn good job removing them, meh.)

Is literally what I do except I use Tamiya 74035 to cut it out of the Gate and God Hand Nippers cut close (Barely even needing to shave to be honest) and do exactly as Plamobot does, I shave it a total of 5 times, each angle slowly cutting it to the middle. I then either said it with 1500 slowly elevating to 3200 but to be honest I don’t even feel the need to do this.

I would say the biggest question is, will this kit be primed and painted, only a topcoat, or nothing at all? Each result needs a different level of care, with priming being the least of a hassle for nub removal because it will fill in those scratches easily. With just paint/topcoat, you’ll have to do a bit of sanding to smooth it out, but again the paint/topcoat will even out the rest. Now if you’re not covering the plastic at all… that is when you really take care to scale the different sandpaper grits, and use polishing/rubbing compounds for the closest bare plastic look.

I usually just work on the models right out of the box. I’ve never painted them or anything like that. I do see though, you can prime the parts and paint them on your own. I just never really realized that. I just kinda guessed they were in the box the way they were meant to be.

That could be cool to prime the pieces and paint them, and apply a clear coat.

Usually, when I do it out of box, I end up having that little “flashy” part from where I cut it, like the plastic was bent it shows that discoloration.

Painting isn’t bad, I’ve done a couple that I did paint.

Although the “Flashy” part you see when cutting the Parts out of the runners are called Stress Marks. It happens either when rather than the plastic being cut it is being forced, could be due to the cutters not being sharp enough and not cutting flush.

Try cutting further away from the parts to reduce/avoid the stress marks and then take a hobby knife to the nubs (and/or sand paper if you prefer).

Definitely agree with Sazabees recommendation on using a sharper blade to cut the pieces. Only way to avoid those marks in the first place is to cut starting at a distance and then getting a feel for how close you can sand/file (depending on preference of using sandpaper or metal files) them. Do you currently use any tools to pull the pieces out from their molds?

I use a pair of side cutters I bought from big lots. They definitely aren’t sharp, but they work. Then I use a hobby knife to file it down and “scrape” away where I cut to make it look smooth.

You’re already doing everything the right way, especially if you touch up with the sandpaper. Have you tried a file yet? I personally am someone who leaves large scuffs with sandpaper, but can really use a file without messing up the whole surface. The ten dollar tamiya set off amazon has served me quite well. Nubs are the bane of a modeler, and a big motivation to paint.

I completely agree. Not a fan of finishing some of these kits with the nubs left in place. Thankfully, they aren’t too visible when seen at a distance. I know with model cars I paint the sprues, clear coat, and remove the parts then I just paint over the nub and you can’t tell at all.