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  1. #1
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    Mr. Hobby Gloss Topcoat... Not so glossy?

    Alright, so I picked up some Mr. Hobby Gloss Topcoat and tested it out today. I used it in two applications: once over unpainted plastic, and also over Tamiya Matt White spray paint. In both cases the topcoat didn't have any kind of glossy effect. In fact, I'd say it was almost as matte as the matte white paint on top of the unpainted pieces. Am I doing something wrong? I have it a few coats in both cases spraying 30 cm away for about 10-20 seconds per coat. Do I need to just use more? Spray closer to the pieces? Any helpful advice would be much appreciated.
    My name is Julian... and I'm a Gundamoholic.

  2. #2
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    First off, make sure you're thoroughly shaking the can before spraying. It can take a minute or more to agitate the mixture in the spray can properly--especially if it's a brand new can, or has been sitting in a drawer or on a shelf for a while. It's possible you're getting thinner coming out, but not much clearcoat coming with it.

    Spray a little closer to the pieces--say, 15cm-25cm. Probably 15-20 would be ideal. That's about how far I am with the Mr. Hobby flat coat I use, and it works well.

    Don't do continuous sprays. Instead, start a little to one side of the piece, depress the nozzle, rapidly move across the piece, and release the nozzle when you clear the piece on the other side. You should have the nozzle depressed for a second or less per pass. This will give you a light coat, prevent any kind of weird pooling effect, and use less spray. You'll need to do multiple passes to get an even coat--likely 2-4, depending on how heavy you put it on.

    If you're spraying outside, don't do it when it's really hot, or really dry out. It can seriously mess up your topcoat application--anywhere from frosting to stippling to dulling, like what you're experiencing.

    I'm not sure how much of this is relevant to what you're doing, or the conditions you're spraying in, but they're all things to watch out for that could cause what you're seeing. It's also possible that the Mr. Hobby Gloss Topcoat is just plain flatter than a regular gloss, but I'm a little skeptical of that.

  3. #3
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    In addition to what Suzaku suggested, try to shake the can in between a couple of passes to keep the contents agitated. You can also try waiting a few minutes before spraying the next layer on.

  4. #4
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    Like all paint in a can, you should make sure the contents are warm. Put the can in a cup/pot of hot water for a minute or two. It really helps the mixing process. Then shake the can for a good minute at the least to make sure you have a good mix.

    I don't really use cans anymore, but the trick with most gloss paints is to do a light quick coat to put some paint on the kit. Then do a slower pass so it has a wet look. DO NOT Sit on the part with the spray, as overspray will cause the paint to pool.


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  5. #5
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    the trick to gloss to get the super shine is o do as many coats as you can. light coat like squee said. that will give it some teeth and a base then just keep doing those thicker coats. what you are looking for is when the paint reflects the light smooth across the piece you know you have applied enough. so once you see the shine stop let it dry then repeat if that makes sense. you will know what shine i am talking about when you put it to practice. even when using flat colors thats how i judge my coats.

  6. #6
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    Cool. I'll give it a try tomorrow or Monday. Thanks for the advice so far guys. If anyone else had anything to add, feel free to chine in.

    Also, now that I think of it, should I apply the same technique to actual paints, or is this method specific to topcoating?
    My name is Julian... and I'm a Gundamoholic.

  7. #7
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    i would say it applies to all but for colors you usually dont need as many coats

  8. #8
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    Wow some really good advice there!
    For me I think spraying on a hot and humid day plus over spraying and subsequent pooling of paint can really ruin your finish.

  9. #9
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    One more question for you guys... For the piece that was raw before the topcoat, do I need to strip it before applying any more topcoat to achieve acceptable results? Or will the new layers fill in the imperfections of the underlying coat?
    My name is Julian... and I'm a Gundamoholic.

  10. #10
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    You should sand it down.


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    I am no longer a Moderator despite what the user title says. Please do NOT pm me with questions on how to do something hobby related or with issues with the board. Just ask in a related thread.


 

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