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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Question Is tamiya 400 grit too coarse for nub removal?

    I get a lot of scratch marks after progressive sanding nubs with 400 to 1500 grits. Should I start with 600 instead? I finish off with sanding sponge that's 1000 and 1500. I'm not sure if going up to 2000 is required. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Re: Is tamiya 400 grit too coarse for nub removal?

    It really depends on the nub and how you sand. I have gone all the way to a 180 grit! The trick when sanding with the low grits is to not go the same direction. If the first pass at 400 you go left to right, the next pass with 500 should be up and down. This will cross the scratches and levels them out. Also always go the same direction with each grit or stage of sanding. It is a hard habit to break, but what I mean is if you are going left to right then all passes during that stage should be from left to right. Don't go back and forth. Then the next stage you go across at the same direction. In this case your next stage should be down to up (or up to down which ever just go the same direction) across the sanding marks of the previous stage. Picture one set vertical the other horizontal like a Tick Tack Toe "+" also DO NOT APPLY PRESSURE when sanding. keep it light and let the paper do the work. I learned that the hard way. And when ever possible sand with a wet paper, wet sanding help keep the grit, or dust off the part and out of the paper. The dust can act as another layer of grit and can actually add scratches which makes more work than you need to fix them.

    As for the 2000 grits sure go for it I have sanding supplies all the way up to 12,000 grit. When I built the RG Sinanju it came with a high gloss finish. I sanded the nubs and went up to the 12,000 grit I wanted to keep the high gloss look the rest of the kit had. The only problem I had was I also used a sanding compound so the parts I sanded actually look better then the rest of the kit. Oops, but a good oops.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also I forgot one small but important detail. With the low grits. I only use them to get the nub it self down to the part then I stop. When you cut the part from the runner, cut a few CM away from the kit this will leave a large nub ,and sand down to the part. I sand very lightly on just the nub itself, then when I get really close to the part I sand with very small movements and just a small part of the paper touching the nub. when I start to see scratches on the part I stop and go up a stage. You don't reallywant the really low grit on the part too much. Just use them to get the nub itself off and down to the part.


    To error is human, to forgive is divine, Luckily I'm neither of these things!

    My WIP: http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...816#post274816

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  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Re: Is tamiya 400 grit too coarse for nub removal?

    Sanding a raised nub lightly will just allow the sanding stick to ruin the surrounding area, and I've never heard of the "+" method before. I might end up deforming the piece if I sand horizontally, and this is my first mg kit.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I use an xacto knife to reduce the nub after cutting, and I sand with a sanding stick(tamiya paper wrapped around a popsicle stick) vertically in one direction. I've sanded with bare paper before but ended badly, barely anyone recommends sanding without a support(sponge or stick).

  4. #4
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    Re: Is tamiya 400 grit too coarse for nub removal?

    If you have time when I get to the house tonight I can up load pictures from a "How To' thing I am getting ready for my blog and it will show you what I'm talking about.
    As for the stick or backing, ya I use sticks as well. but sometimes the place is to small or to tight to get a stick in properly. What I do for those situations is this.
    1. I cut the paper into a long strip only about 1/2 inch wide and at least 6 to 7 inches long.
    2. Fold the paper in half length wise. So now you have a long strip 1/4 inch wide with grit on both sides.
    3. fold one end back on itself just a bit. enough that I can still hold the end of the fold.
    4 just use the end of the fold to sand.

    This will make the paper stiff like you have a stick in it but small enough that I can get into the tight little places that a sponge or stick can not get into.

    Sanding is as much and art form as painting and building.

    Here are a few pictures I just made to show you what I mean for making a tight spot sanding paper.

    sanding sticks (2).JPG
    sanding sticks (3).jpg
    sanding sticks (4).jpg
    sanding sticks (1).jpg

    I know you want to do well on your first MG, I know the feeling. You should see my first train wreck...I mean MG build. LOL

    - - - Updated - - -

    Personally an exacto blade dose not come near my models. Too easy to slip and gouge a mark in the part. But I have nerve damage and my hands shake like a lot! Makes building small stuff a big challenge, but that is why I do it. It makes me learn how to deal with the shaking and get better control over it.


    To error is human, to forgive is divine, Luckily I'm neither of these things!

    My WIP: http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...816#post274816

    My built stuff:http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...eys-Big-Garage

    My Blog postings. https://gundammonkeysgarage.wordpress.com/

  5. #5
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    Re: Is tamiya 400 grit too coarse for nub removal?

    Are you planning on painting this kit, or simply snap? If the former, go ahead with 400. I start with 320 sanding sponges, then 400, 600, maybe 800 then primer. If you're just snapping the kit, start with 600 as any scratches will show. Its more work, but less larger scratches.

    If you have parts where you don't like the scratches, you can always polish the plastic with polishing compounds, or if its something quick... toothpaste!


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    I am no longer a Moderator despite what the user title says. Please do NOT pm me with questions on how to do something hobby related or with issues with the board. Just ask in a related thread.


 

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