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  1. #1
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    Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    Hey all,

    For the past couple of years, I've been a hobbyist in the Warhammer world. I've only played a few games, but I've spent countless hours over the past two years modeling (assembling) and painting models for both Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer: Age of Sigmar. I have built one HG Astaroth kit already (haven't painted it), am working on an HG Barbatos, and have an HG Zedas R being delivered today.

    All that said, I have noticed that the assembling/modeling part of Warhammer Push Together models and Gundam kits are very similar. When you get into the more customizable Warhammer kits, it does get a bit different.

    All that said, I'm not used to how Gundam modeling and painting work when compared to Warhammer. For example, with Warhammer models, I assemble them as much as is possible (including gluing all parts together with plastic glue) until they get to the point where further assembly would get in the way painting. Once primed, using plastic glue is no longer possible as it can mess up the primer and paint job. So, super glue is used instead.

    With Gundam models, are all pieces painted separately and then reassembled as push together? Or are they assembled with plastic glue, primed, and then painted? As I mentioned before, it seems that assembly of Gundam models is very similar go Warhammer Push Together models. But, I think the painting process may be drastically different.

    All that said, how do you all assemble and paint your custom models? Which method do you use?

    Thanks in advance!

    SG

  2. #2
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    All Gundam models probably around the early 90s to present are what we called Snap together model kits. Which means no glue is required to put them together. HOWEVER glue is still used to strengthen joints, get rid of seams, and outright improve the model kit. Just cause you can easily put it together doesn't mean you can't customize it :3

    For the glory of Sigamar!

    though I've been a 40 K Space Wolves Myself XD

    "Ignorance is the Enemy...Understanding is the Weapon"-Anonymous

    Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed. -G.K. Chesterton.

    Sword Freak

  3. #3
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    Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    I think some of what you're asking is up to your preference. As Kenico stated you don't need any glue to put your model together so you can assemble the whole thing and then take it back apart to paint it. Some people paint before assembly some people like to build, visualize and tear down and paint. I would say since you haven't built any Gundams building it in full might be beneficial just so you can get a real good idea of how everything moves and see what you want to paint and how. As far as how much disassembly you need to paint it, again really depends on what your painting. Sorry I realize I'm not answering any of your questions with any certainty but my recommendation is build a whole kit and get a feel for it and I'm sure with your experience you'll know what to do.
    War. War never changes.

  4. #4
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    Thank you both for all the info!

    SG

  5. #5
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    Ya what they said. ^^ I think it really depends on the kit you are building, and how far you want to go with it. I have a few kits that I just snapped together and just did a bit of lining. OOB (Out Of Box build) I have others that are full paint but I still painted then built, so all the seam lines still show. But it is OK with what I was doing with them. Now I'm working on a Meteor Unit, Dendrobium, and a 3/350th Spacebattleship Yamato. They are fully built in sections and the seam lines have been covered or gotten rid of. Now I'm in the process of painting them, but that takes a boat load of masking (pun intended) . Like Gunpla.newb said I know I didn't nail down an answer, but in all reality there is no correct answer to the question.

    List of things to do today. 1. Get a sword. 2. Name it Kindness. 3 Kill people with Kindness.

    My WIP: http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...816#post274816

    My built stuff:http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...eys-Big-Garage

  6. #6
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by gundammonkey View Post
    seam lines still show
    Do you mean the seam lines created by injection molding or where the parts should fit together?

    Thanks

    SG

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ServiceGames View Post
    Do you mean the seam lines created by injection molding or where the parts should fit together?

    Thanks

    SG
    I'm pretty sure he's talking about where the parts fit together. If you paint them separately and then stick them together certain armor parts will show a seam line. Sometimes the seam lines are hidden but on some models, especially HG's, they can be right down the middle of a leg or arm. You can remove the seam line with glue and or putty and in that case you have to paint it after that line has been removed. So when you were asking about assembly and then painting it really depends. You don't have to remove any seam lines or do any modifying to make a nice painted kit, but if you want something that looks like a real mecha or just something done really nice you might have to. Like I said earlier I would recommend building your kit and I think given your background you'll probably know exactly what to do to get the best results.
    War. War never changes.

  8. #8

    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    Having been a "pro painter/converter" of 40k stuff (only say that because I actually supported myself for a couple years, not necc that I was Golden Demon level ability) I can tell you there is a slight difference between the style of the two hobbies. In some ways Gunpla is much easier than minis (mostly because you never have to paint a GD EYE onto a giant robot etc, but in other ways it is much harder because you lose alot of the "tricks" that hide mistakes or imperfections in minis.

    In 40K the "realistic" style goes a long way, washes and inks can be very forgiving on tiny models, whereas in Gunpla, there are so many big flat open areas and precision and detail is the goal. I still use some of my 40K techniques on some of my models and I like the end result but I know my final product is nowhere near the ideal of precise perfect details some of the "pro" Gunpla modelers achieve.

    Personally I build fully, then decide what will be what colors and begin disassembling and putting all the parts into separate bags, then once fully taken down, I sand and trim all the parts so there is no flash or "nubs" visible. Some modelers will go to great lengths to hide as many of the seam lines as possible, usually with glue, putty, and sanding so more of the armor looks like giant single pieces.
    Another reason lots of modelers break down then paint, is for he ease and uniformity of spray/airbrushing the parts. In 40K, pouring washes into cracks,creases, and gaps can hide the transition from one area into another, in Gunpla, color separation is mostly done by actually painting different parts different colors and then minimizing the gaps and making the junctions as clean and precise as possible.
    I tried hand painting a few of my first models and got acceptable results, but honestly, brush painting all the armor pieces takes FOR..........EVER, so I broke down and started practicing with an airbrush.
    Here is a Strike I did a couple years back and you can see the layers and wash on it's head (2-3 diff shades of white and a black ink wash), and you can also see on his torso where I was experimenting with using a technical drafting pen to do panel lines, which worked great as long as you didn't look too closely, zoomed in they look like crap.

  9. #9
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    yup what Gunpl.newb said.

    List of things to do today. 1. Get a sword. 2. Name it Kindness. 3 Kill people with Kindness.

    My WIP: http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...816#post274816

    My built stuff:http://www.gundamforums.com/showthre...eys-Big-Garage

  10. #10
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    Re: Coming from a Warhammer background... have some questions

    I have an airbrush (for Warhammer) as well as a set of three Gundam Markers (very fine tip). Does paint need to be applied before using the markers? I guess I'm just a tad confused as I've seen someone (who was fairly new to airbrushing) take literally hours to paint all the pieces before clear coating them all, panel lining, and then clear coating them again. While I have won a couple of monthly painting competitions at my local Games Workshop store, I'm NOWHERE NEAR golden demon quality. It just seems that I could do a lot with the colors on some of the models I have by using GW paints instead. Also, GW provides a much wider range of highlighting and weathering techniques/paints. I guess I'm just not sure really where to start.

    SG

    EDIT: For example, I just finishing putting together an HG IBO Kimaris. Love the model, but the purple is a bit dull. Using some Nagaroth Night as a base and then Xereus Purple as a layer, I can get a much richer purple. I just don't knowr eally where to start on that. Just remove the purple parts, paint those, and reassemble?


 

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