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Unicsin
February 20, 2012, 4:42 PM
I bought some Tamiya acrylic paints and a Tamiya Nissan GT-R to practice on and I found out that I have no idea how to spray paint anything.

I've been doing quick short burst sprays about 6-12 inches away from the model (be it the car or Gundam) but the paint runs and doesn't get to the model properly. I wanted to know the proper way of spray painting, and how I should do it on Gundam. I painted the frame of my Sinanju without a problem, but I have no idea how to paint the armor parts. I've washed them in soapy water, dried, and sanded them but can't figure out how to paint them.

Any help is appreciated!

Joe
February 20, 2012, 5:55 PM
Give that rattle can a good shaking! At least 2-3 minutes straight of vigorous shaking. Stay closer to 12inches away than 6. As for the short quick bursts; make sure you're moving in a sweeping motion. I always start spraying just left of the part (parts if I'm doing a large batch) and I move in one fluid quick motion all the way past the part(s). Then I do the same thing in the opposite direction. I repeat this a couple times and make a total of six passes (3 left, 3 right). Those quick passes should take just a few seconds. I let that set for a few hours (if it's cold or too warm, bring it inside and cover it with a box big enough that it's not touching the parts). If you got good coverage the first time you may be able to skip this part. I'll turn the parts 90 degrees in either direction and repeat the whole process. Turning the part works really well for odd shaped parts where there is overhang or shapes sticking in odd angles.

Here are some great videos I've found:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uxJeY3fgPU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMroZFHKkHM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQTZKBm6aOc

squeam
February 20, 2012, 5:55 PM
I could explain in lengthy detail different painting techniques, but I'm too lazy. Instead, I'll refer you to YouTuber Vektar and his 2 short spray painting tutorials:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uxJeY3fgPU&feature=player_detailpage and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H3-acWSKYE&feature=player_detailpage

This is basically how I have sprayed in the past and it has worked well. Hopefully, you can find some pointers or at least diagnose where you're having trouble and go from there.

Unicsin
February 26, 2012, 9:42 PM
Another quick question, I bought barbecue sticks and Styrofoam to stuck the parts on and hold but the paperclips I bought were the wrong ones. I wanted to know what I can use to stick the barbecue sticks to the parts now, and if I use tape, then to I paint the outer side, let it dry/cure, and then spray the inner side? Thanks so much!

CKai Cydek
February 26, 2012, 10:41 PM
Another quick question, I bought barbecue sticks and Styrofoam to stuck the parts on and hold but the paperclips I bought were the wrong ones. I wanted to know what I can use to stick the barbecue sticks to the parts now, and if I use tape, then to I paint the outer side, let it dry/cure, and then spray the inner side? Thanks so much!

Normally, what most painters use are alligator clips, like these:

http://pics.towerhobbies.com/image/b/bukm2040.jpg



But sometimes depending on the parts, clips like these will also work:

http://myitchyfingers.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/clip1.jpg



Or you could go by old reliable, Blu Tack:

http://officeplaza.hu/shop_ordered/1321/shop_pic/Gyurmaragaszto_Bostik_Blu-Tack.jpg

Blu Tack is a sticky, clay-like adhesive substance that can be used to adhere the barbecue sticks onto parts & also serve to mask in certain situations. They're non-toxic, and reusable after you peel 'em off.

If you use tape to secure the part, then you should paint it the way you described above - by painting one side, letting it dry, then do the other side. But in many cases, if you mount the parts right, you won't even have to do that. It's very rare that I ever have a need to paint one side first, then the other. When it does happen, it's usually on clear parts that attach without tabs.

Unicsin
February 26, 2012, 11:08 PM
I have those paper clips but the back of them is flat so there is no place to stick the barbecue stick into.

CKai Cydek
February 26, 2012, 11:13 PM
In that case, Blu Tack is your friend :)

Unicsin
February 27, 2012, 1:28 AM
I ran few strips of chewing gum under water and used that since I don't have Blu Tack at hand, so far it's holding up, will have to see if it remains that way tomorrow when I paint em.

Thanks for the Blu Tack suggestion, I'm gonna buy some ASAP.

CKai Cydek
February 27, 2012, 2:25 AM
http://www.avatarhosting.net/pics/46100/CKaiP03.gif

ACK!! NO!! Don't use chewing gum!! That's hell to remove once it fully dries up! Also, if used for masking, it could peel off the rest of the paint around it!

Not to mention...it's kinda gross :P

Joe
February 27, 2012, 3:07 PM
Chewing gum was a mistake, which unfortunately, you may be finding out the hard way. Believe me, I'm not saying that to insult you... I'm saying it because it was one of the first methods I tried when I started spraying :-P. So you're not alone.

Anyway, have you tried super gluing the clips you bought to the skewers? Or tape?

2470
I use these guys. You can get a 6 pack at Wal-Mart for around $2.